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Based on 2 ½ years of singing and playing with Navajo county western bands, her book, The Sound of Navajo Country: Music, Language and Diné Belonging (forthcoming March 13th, 2017, University of North Carolina Press), examines cultural intimacy and generational nostalgia on the Navajo (Diné) Nation (click here for brief interviews in English and Italian about her research). This book is the first in a series, Critical Indigeneities, edited by J. Kēhaulani Kauanui and Jean M. O’Brien and focusing on contemporary indigenous experience and critical theory. Her research interests include: music and language, anthropology of the voice, politics of authenticity, indigeneity and belonging, music of Native North America, Sardinia and the Appalachian mountains, race and musical genre, music as cultural performance, indigenous language revitalization and U.S. working class expressive cultures. Together with Kerry F. Thompson (Diné), she has a forthcoming article on the recent Navajo Nation presidential election and language fluency debate, titled “The Right to Lead: Language, Iconicity Diné Presidential Politics. Recent articles include “Radmilla’s Voice: Music Genre, Blood Quantum and Belonging on the Navajo Nation” (Cultural Anthropology, 2014) and “Rita(hhh): Placemaking and Country Music on the Navajo Nation” (Ethnomusicology, 2009).

 

Kristina Jacobsen holds a PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University, the MPhil in Ethnomusicology from Columbia University, a Master’s in Ethnomusicology from Arizona State University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Music (flute performance) and History (concentration: Native North America).

Heterophony: Texture, Technique, and Social Commentary

This lecture is in two parts: the first draws from my research on the 1960s jazz avant-garde and musicians’ interests in heterophonic musical textures. For the second part, I perform original music that utilizes heterophony and “noise” in a solo electronic and improvised format.

The Gay West: From Drug Store Cowboys to Rodeo Queens

The masculine ideal represented by the American cowboy is variously interpreted by spectators, dancers, musicians, and contestants at gay rodeos and country western dances across the U.S. Examining embodied gender practices within these communities, this talk articulates the sonic, social, and geographical spaces of the gay American West.

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