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Amjad Ali Khan is one of the undisputed masters of the music world. For many, he takes on a celestial avatar when he is playing the Sarod. Born to Sarod icon Haafiz Ali Khan, he gave his first performance at the age of six. Over the course of his career, he has delivered his music in a flexible instrument line that is vocal in its expressiveness. He has reinvented the technique of Sarod playing which today is distinct in its nomenclature. He has won numerous accolades including a Grammy nomination, the Crystal Award by the World Economic Forum and has performed at venues the world over including Carnegie Hall and the Royal Albert Hall. Amaan Ali Khan and Ayaan Ali Khan represent the 7th generation of a musical lineage, as sons and disciples of the sarod icon,Amjad Ali Khan. With him they have performed across the globe at the Kennedy Center, and Smithsonian and WOMAD festivals on many continents. They have also collaborated with guitarist Derek Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band, among others, and established themselves as a duo, carrying forward their musical legacy in sync with both tradition and contemporary times. In 2014, Amjad Ali Khan, Amaan Ali Khan and Ayaan Ali Khan performed at the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway on as well as the Nobel Peace PrizeConcert along with the lineup of Queen Latifa, Steven Tyler, Nuno Bettencourt and Laura Mvula. They present traditional Indian Classical Ragas and Indian Folk Music that will be interpreted on their Sarods.

You Can’t Tell It Like I Can: Black Women, Music, and the Struggle for Social Justice in America

You Can’t Tell It Like I Can: Black Women, Music, and the Struggle for Social Justice in America

This lecture/performance explores how black women have used music as a method of shaping the public rhetoric and sentiment surrounding the black civil rights struggle in America. Through a historical framework that moves through the height of the abolitionist movement, the Popular front during the 1930s and 1940s, the frontlines of the direct action campaigns of the 1960s, and the proliferation of the Black Power movement in the 1970s.

An Americanish Songbook: Linda Ronstadt’s “other” Country

An Americanish Songbook: Linda Ronstadt’s “other” Country

This talk will consider performances and recordings by singer Linda Ronstadt to propose what I refer to as her Americanish musical songbook. The suffix “ish” here intends to accentuate the “somewhat” or “to some extent” of “American” that Ronstadt—Tucson born and raised—lived and sonically imagined through her extraordinary musical career.

Arab Musicking on the U.S.–Mexico Border

Arab Musicking on the U.S.–Mexico Border

This talk explores the relationship between trauma and identity by examining Arab music performance on the U.S.–Mexico border. Drawing on the musicking of Syrian and Mexican migrant communities, I interrogate theories of cultural and psychological trauma and borderland epistemologies to explore how border tensions influence the often-fraught views of identity.

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